Friday, April 18, 2014

Mom's Car for sale....

http://myrtlebeach.craigslist.org/cto/4428769448.html


 Toyota Carolla 2012 S 4-door RED - $17000 (Murrells Inlet)

© craigslist - Map data © OpenStreetMap
2012 Toyota Carolla odometer: 2169VIN: 5YFBU4EE9CPO23831automatic transmission title : clean
VERY LOW MILES: 2169 HWY miles! EXCELLENT CONDITION. Rarely driven, Single Owner 2012 Toyota Carolla S-model Barcelona Red metallic (exterior) and dark charcoal (interior). Automatic, 1.8L 4-cyl DOHC 16 valve VVT-i

Halogen headlamps
Black Sport Trim
2 Keys and remotes
Complete Driver's Manual
AC
MP3 Player 6 speakers audio system
Tilt/Telescope sport steering wheel
60/40 split fold down rear seat
Power Doors and windows
Cruise Control

MUST SEE... LIKE NEW (no joke). Just completely detailed and even had engine compartment cleaned. Stock picture (more pictures coming).
  • do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers

Madison Performs at Regional Dance Competition...

"Dancer" Madison performs with her company at a Regional Dance competition in Raleigh NC last weekend.  She earns the team top notch placement and some personal awards as well.  The company won two platinum, two elite high golds, 2nd overalls in lyrical & production, 4th overall in Jazz.  She dances TAP, JAZZ, LYRICAL and PRODUCTION.  


Here are some Pictures of her performance:

Madison (2nd from R) and her troupe

Madison doing "Anything for you"  Lyrical Dance  (Platinum Award, 2nd overall)

Madison center stage

Madison gives "High Five" as part of her routine.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Greenville, NC

Training and Lectures on Friday and Saturday at the Saltz Medical -Spa.  My new gig in Greenville.  Enjoyed the experience, the staff and meeting folks helping that new Med-Spa to become a premier anti-aging and restorative medicine center in the Southeast.  



The Saltz MedSpa reception room and lounge.  A shot of Downtown Greenville, SC overlooking the city from Falls Park and the River.




A young and vibrant crowd gathers and enjoys all of
what Greenville has to offer.  Art, Music, Excellent restaurants...

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

History invades Hobcaw


History invades Hobcaw

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014
On Saturday, a field at historic Hobcaw Barony was transformed by the 3rd United States Army Civil War Reenactors as they exhibited what a typical war encampment would have been like during the War Between The States.
The camp featured authentic reproductions of the soldiers’ equipment, including tents, uniforms, weaponry, and cookery.
First Lt. Mike Glazier commanded a squad of three local reenactors, Alvin Holcomb, Amos Dickerson, and his daughter Mary.
Lisa Boynton, a resident of Myrtle Beach, was also at the camp to display the Confederate uniform.
There were more than 100 attendees of the reenactment. The day’s events began in the Discovery Center, where Lee Brockington, Hobcaw’s senior interpreter, gave a brief oral history of Georgetown’s role in the war to visitors, and also told the story of the sinking of the Harvest Moon.
Visitors were then shuttled to the field where a number of displays illustrated more history of the war, including an officer’s desk kit, a number of rifles, and a small cannonball dug up by Glazier’s dog in his Pawleys Island yard.
“It’s amazing to live here,” says Glazier. “I had no idea the amount of history this place holds unitl I moved here.”
Glazier gave presentations on the evolution of the wardrobe, weaponry, tactics, communications, and major developments during the course of the war, and along with Holcomb, Boynton, and Dickerson, also gave drilling and firing demonstrations.
Originally from Washington, D.C., Glazier became interested in the war while getting his undergraduate degrees in accounting and history from Shepherd University in West Virginia when a Southern teacher brought a new perspective on the war for him.
While there, he was very near Harper’s Ferry, and also toured Gettysburg and Antietam. His first reenactment was with the 3rd U.S. Infantry in 1990 in D.C., and after he moved to the Lowcountry in 1996, he became captain of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer, Company 1 Reenactors.
He has been featured reenacting, along with his son, in National Geographic.
“It’s a great hobby,” says Glazier, “Instead of golf or surfing, I do this.”
While this was not Glazier’s first reenactment, it was the first for both Holcomb and Dickerson. Dickerson, who was asked by Glazier to participate, was very interested in the idea.
“I appreciate anything that involves getting away from modern conveniences,” Dickerson said.
And that seems to be a common theme for a lot of the reenactors.
As a CPA, Glazier said he loves the chance to get away from the computer and cell phones. Living the history of these soldiers is a big part of what reenactors across the spectrum do, but an equally big draw is pulling themselves back in time to how their ancestors lived and fought during these wars.
“And it’s a lot of fun,” says Glazier. “It’s part camping, part Halloween, part playing Army.”
“What I liked about it was understanding the perspective on the mind of the men going into these battles, going face-to-face with each other,” said George Hendershot of Pawleys Island. “It’s very fascinating.”
Dr. J.P. Saleeby, a reenactor in The Society of Civil War Surgeons, said the event was very interesting, and his wife, Sharon, complimented the rich, historical environment in which it was set.
“Hobcaw was a great place to have this event,” said Glazier, “and we hope to do it there again in the fall or next spring.”

-------------
http://www.southstrandnews.com/article/20140320/GTT06/140329992

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Am Civil War Day at the Hobcaw Barony


Joe McGill, a Civil War re-enactor and historic preservationist, slept in a slave cabin at Hobcaw Barony to make a statement about the importance of preserving all of our history.


1861 Days
WhenSat, March 15, 11am – 5pm
WhereHobcaw Barony (map)
DescriptionAs the nation marks the Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War, the Belle W. Baruch Foundation commemorates history 150 years ago with a living history of Horry and Georgetown Counties. A small group of reenactors from the US Army,1860, 3rd US Infantry Civil War Reenactors, Inc., will be at Hobcaw Barony on Saturday, March 15. Uniformed soldiers and officers of the US Army 3rd Infantry will be encamped in the woods of the plantation and plan to share the history of the period, discuss what led SC to be the first state to seceed from the Union and how the military responded to the governmental crisis. A Confederate reenactor will be present and an African American interpreter of the 54th Massachusetts Colored Troops discusses the brief period of time that group spent stationed in Georgetown in 1865. During their presentations, the reenactors discuss uniforms, equipment, weapons and guns. Firing and drill demonstrations, as well as battle tactical planning, helps visitors understand the training which occurred in camp. Michael Glazier and friends were the reenactors of the day, with live fire demos. A sometimes humorous display involves "pay call," a living history reenactment of US Army pay day for the troops. Leisure time activities and foodways, including free samples of "hardtack," are part of the day, as visitors walk through camp and see artifact and touch tables, as well as posters and displays about the war.

For a nice article on the subject and a quote from Sharon and I read this piece that was printed in the Georgetown Times by Joe Nooft:  http://www.southstrandnews.com/article/20140320/GTT06/140329992

History invades Hobcaw

  • Thursday, March 20, 2014
  •  
  • Updated Thursday, March 20, 2014 10:38 am
A display at the reenactmment shows some of the items a soldier would have with him during the Civil War.

Photos

On Saturday, a field at historic Hobcaw Barony was transformed by the 3rd United States Army Civil War Reenactors as they exhibited what a typical war encampment would have been like during the War Between The States.
The camp featured authentic reproductions of the soldiers’ equipment, including tents, uniforms, weaponry, and cookery.
First Lt. Mike Glazier commanded a squad of three local reenactors, Alvin Holcomb, Amos Dickerson, and his daughter Mary.
Lisa Boynton, a resident of Myrtle Beach, was also at the camp to display the Confederate uniform.
There were more than 100 attendees of the reenactment. The day’s events began in the Discovery Center, where Lee Brockington, Hobcaw’s senior interpreter, gave a brief oral history of Georgetown’s role in the war to visitors, and also told the story of the sinking of the Harvest Moon.
Visitors were then shuttled to the field where a number of displays illustrated more history of the war, including an officer’s desk kit, a number of rifles, and a small cannonball dug up by Glazier’s dog in his Pawleys Island yard.
“It’s amazing to live here,” says Glazier. “I had no idea the amount of history this place holds unitl I moved here.”
Glazier gave presentations on the evolution of the wardrobe, weaponry, tactics, communications, and major developments during the course of the war, and along with Holcomb, Boynton, and Dickerson, also gave drilling and firing demonstrations.
Originally from Washington, D.C., Glazier became interested in the war while getting his undergraduate degrees in accounting and history from Shepherd University in West Virginia when a Southern teacher brought a new perspective on the war for him.
While there, he was very near Harper’s Ferry, and also toured Gettysburg and Antietam. His first reenactment was with the 3rd U.S. Infantry in 1990 in D.C., and after he moved to the Lowcountry in 1996, he became captain of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer, Company 1 Reenactors.
He has been featured reenacting, along with his son, in National Geographic.
“It’s a great hobby,” says Glazier, “Instead of golf or surfing, I do this.”
While this was not Glazier’s first reenactment, it was the first for both Holcomb and Dickerson. Dickerson, who was asked by Glazier to participate, was very interested in the idea.
“I appreciate anything that involves getting away from modern conveniences,” Dickerson said.
And that seems to be a common theme for a lot of the reenactors.
As a CPA, Glazier said he loves the chance to get away from the computer and cell phones. Living the history of these soldiers is a big part of what reenactors across the spectrum do, but an equally big draw is pulling themselves back in time to how their ancestors lived and fought during these wars.
“And it’s a lot of fun,” says Glazier. “It’s part camping, part Halloween, part playing Army.”
“What I liked about it was understanding the perspective on the mind of the men going into these battles, going face-to-face with each other,” said George Hendershot of Pawleys Island. “It’s very fascinating.”
Dr. J.P. Saleeby, a reenactor in The Society of Civil War Surgeons, said the event was very interesting, and his wife, Sharon, complimented the rich, historical environment in which it was set.
“Hobcaw was a great place to have this event,” said Glazier, “and we hope to do it there again in the fall or next spring.”On Saturday, a field at historic Hobcaw Barony was transformed by the 3rd United States Army Civil War Reenactors as they exhibited what a typical war encampment would have been like during the War Between The States.
The camp featuredOn Saturday, a field at historic Hobcaw Barony was transformed by the 3rd United States Army Civil War Reenactors as they exhibited what a typical war encampment would have been like during the War Between The States.
The camp featured authentic reproductions of the soldiers’ equipment, including tents, uniforms, weaponry, and cookery.
First Lt. Mike Glazier commanded a squad of three local reenactors, Alvin Holcomb, Amos Dickerson, and his daughter Mary.
Lisa Boynton, a resident of Myrtle Beach, was also at the camp to display the Confederate uniform.
There were more than 100 attendees of the reenactment. The day’s events began in the Discovery Center, where Lee Brockington, Hobcaw’s senior interpreter, gave a brief oral history of Georgetown’s role in the war to visitors, and also told the story of the sinking of the Harvest Moon.
Visitors were then shuttled to the field where a number of displays illustrated more history of the war, including an officer’s desk kit, a number of rifles, and a small cannonball dug up by Glazier’s dog in his Pawleys Island yard.
“It’s amazing to live here,” says Glazier. “I had no idea the amount of history this place holds unitl I moved here.”
Glazier gave presentations on the evolution of the wardrobe, weaponry, tactics, communications, and major developments during the course of the war, and along with Holcomb, Boynton, and Dickerson, also gave drilling and firing demonstrations.
Originally from Washington, D.C., Glazier became interested in the war while getting his undergraduate degrees in accounting and history from Shepherd University in West Virginia when a Southern teacher brought a new perspective on the war for him.
While there, he was very near Harper’s Ferry, and also toured Gettysburg and Antietam. His first reenactment was with the 3rd U.S. Infantry in 1990 in D.C., and after he moved to the Lowcountry in 1996, he became captain of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer, Company 1 Reenactors.
He has been featured reenacting, along with his son, in National Geographic.
“It’s a great hobby,” says Glazier, “Instead of golf or surfing, I do this.”
While this was not Glazier’s first reenactment, it was the first for both Holcomb and Dickerson. Dickerson, who was asked by Glazier to participate, was very interested in the idea.
“I appreciate anything that involves getting away from modern conveniences,” Dickerson said.
And that seems to be a common theme for a lot of the reenactors.
As a CPA, Glazier said he loves the chance to get away from the computer and cell phones. Living the history of these soldiers is a big part of what reenactors across the spectrum do, but an equally big draw is pulling themselves back in time to how their ancestors lived and fought during these wars.
“And it’s a lot of fun,” says Glazier. “It’s part camping, part Halloween, part playing Army.”
“What I liked about it was understanding the perspective on the mind of the men going into these battles, going face-to-face with each other,” said George Hendershot of Pawleys Island. “It’s very fascinating.”
Dr. J.P. Saleeby, a reenactor in The Society of Civil War Surgeons, said the event was very interesting, and his wife, Sharon, complimented the rich, historical environment in which it was set.
“Hobcaw was a great place to have this event,” said Glazier, “and we hope to do it there again in the fall or next spring.” authentic reproductions of the soldiers’ equipment, including tents, uniforms, weaponry, and cookery.
First Lt. Mike Glazier commanded a squad of three local reenactors, Alvin Holcomb, Amos Dickerson, and his daughter Mary.
Lisa Boynton, a resident of Myrtle Beach, was also at the camp to display the Confederate uniform.
There were more than 100 attendees of the reenactment. The day’s events began in the Discovery Center, where Lee Brockington, Hobcaw’s senior interpreter, gave a brief oral history of Georgetown’s role in the war to visitors, and also told the story of the sinking of the Harvest Moon.
Visitors were then shuttled to the field where a number of displays illustrated more history of the war, including an officer’s desk kit, a number of rifles, and a small cannonball dug up by Glazier’s dog in his Pawleys Island yard.
“It’s amazing to live here,” says Glazier. “I had no idea the amount of history this place holds unitl I moved here.”
Glazier gave presentations on the evolution of the wardrobe, weaponry, tactics, communications, and major developments during the course of the war, and along with Holcomb, Boynton, and Dickerson, also gave drilling and firing demonstrations.
Originally from Washington, D.C., Glazier became interested in the war while getting his undergraduate degrees in accounting and history from Shepherd University in West Virginia when a Southern teacher brought a new perspective on the war for him.
While there, he was very near Harper’s Ferry, and also toured Gettysburg and Antietam. His first reenactment was with the 3rd U.S. Infantry in 1990 in D.C., and after he moved to the Lowcountry in 1996, he became captain of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer, Company 1 Reenactors.
He has been featured reenacting, along with his son, in National Geographic.
“It’s a great hobby,” says Glazier, “Instead of golf or surfing, I do this.”
While this was not Glazier’s first reenactment, it was the first for both Holcomb and Dickerson. Dickerson, who was asked by Glazier to participate, was very interested in the idea.
“I appreciate anything that involves getting away from modern conveniences,” Dickerson said.
And that seems to be a common theme for a lot of the reenactors.
As a CPA, Glazier said he loves the chance to get away from the computer and cell phones. Living the history of these soldiers is a big part of what reenactors across the spectrum do, but an equally big draw is pulling themselves back in time to how their ancestors lived and fought during these wars.
“And it’s a lot of fun,” says Glazier. “It’s part camping, part Halloween, part playing Army.”
“What I liked about it was understanding the perspective on the mind of the men going into these battles, going face-to-face with each other,” said George Hendershot of Pawleys Island. “It’s very fascinating.”
Dr. J.P. Saleeby, a reenactor in The Society of Civil War Surgeons, said the event was very interesting, and his wife, Sharon, complimented the rich, historical environment in which it was set.
“Hobcaw was a great place to have this event,” said Glazier, “and we hope to do it there again in the fall or next spring.”




Saturday, March 01, 2014

Danube River Cruise Friends visit us in Murrells Inlet

Rich and Barb our Danube River Cruise friends from Indianapolis, Indiana are down at the Inlet/Pawleys for some Golf and R&R and to escape the nasty cold weather up north.  We have met up for dinner and a few glasses of wine :)

We hit Quigley's for $20 Tuesdays and last night dined at BLISS just around the corner from us.

Sharon, Barbara & Rich chatting it up over a glass or 2 or 3 of wine at our cottage.  Oh and Phoebe is perched on
the back of the sofa.

 link to pics of our group